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ArrowSeason 6StephenVideos


ArrowSeason 6StephenVideos

Don’t forget, Arrow returns on a new night and time; Thursday, October 12th on the CW!



NewsRobbieThe Babysitter

SCREEN RANT – Netflix has assigned its original horror comedy The Babysitter an October premiere date. The streaming service has been putting a lot of work into its original horror content in the last year or so, with the crown jewel on that front being hit series Stranger Things.

Acquired by Netflix last year, The Babysitter is a production of New Line Cinema, and is directed by McG (Charlie’s Angels, Terminator: Salvation). The script was written by Brian Duffield, who also wrote the 2015 Divergent series entry Insurgent. The plot of The Babysitter is a fairly familiar one, albeit with a twist. A 12-year-old boy falls madly in love with his attractive babysitter – as a boy that age is wont to do – but before things can get creepy in that sense, stuff gets weird, as it turns out said babysitter is a member of a satanic cult that wants to sacrifice the boy.

After spending the last near-year on Netflix’s shelf, the service has decided to unleash The Babysitter on subscribers just in time for the Halloween season, on Friday, October 13 to be exact.



ArrowSeason 6StephenTelevision ShowsVideos

A little over a month left of waiting, Arrow returns October 12th!



ArrowStephenTelevision ShowsVideos


ArrowStephenTelevision ShowsVideos


NewsRobbieX-Files Revival

Great news! Robbie is set to reprise his role as Agent Miller in the new season of The X-Files, along with Lauren Ambrose as Agent Einstein.

TVLine has learned exclusively that Robbie Amelland Lauren Ambrose have signed on to reprise their roles as Agents Miller and Einstein in the series’ latest revival (set to bow on Fox in early 2018). It remains unclear how many of Season 11’s 10 episodes they will appear in.

The pair made their X-Files debut in last year’s six-episode revival as FBI special agents who bore more than a passing resemblance to David Duchovny’s Mulder and Gillian Anderson’s Scully. (Amell’s Miller was open to nontraditional ideas and explanations, while Ambrose’s Agent Einstein — a redheaded doctor who chose to make her career in the Bureau — was far more interested in solving mysteries by using clear-cut, irrefutable science.)

Source: TVLine